Friday, October 3, 2008

LIBERTY BELL, B-17

Those of you who have seen my emails and read my blog know that I have more than a passing interest in WWII aircraft. Especially, the B-17.
When I learned that the Liberty Bell was going to be visiting Tucson International Airport this past Saturday, I made plans to visit.
And, I was lucky. When I arrived, the plane was parked on the tarmac, all by itself, behind a cyclone fence. I walked over to the mobile information vehicle and asked what was going on. Scott Mayer looked up and said the Liberty Bell wasn't schedule to fly again for another hour and three quarters. Then he looked me over and said, you wanna walk out there and look close up? In my mind I said, "you gotta be kidding!," but what came out was, "sure."
Scott opened the gate to the tarmac and off I went. To my amazement, There wasn't anyone even near the plane, except myself and one crew member on board, who promptly left the scene as soon as I showed up.
So, let me give you a little tour of my plane

The first thing you notice is the beautiful and artistic rendition of the aircraft's ID on its nose, the Liberty Bell. America isn't always associated with fine arts, but the fly boys of WWII certainly had a way with fuselage art! And they had a way of turning a machine meant for maximum destruction into a playful and provocative proclamation of youthful fun and brashness.
At least until Liberty Bell was over its target. Then, not so much.

The next thing on your walk around that you notice is, this thing is like an ocotillo. Pretty to look at in season, but painful to touch. It's loaded with defensive weapons pointed every which way!

This is what I call the "Hatch of Honor." I don't know the exact story behind this. It appears as though any veteran who flies on Liberty Bell has the opportunity to leave a lasting memory in Sharpie ink on the fuselage hatch. I examined the hatch for quite some time and found loads of signatures from former pilot and crew members of other B-17s. If my understanding of who can sign this hatch is correct, I think that this is a fitting tribute to the many brave men who flew these crafts. Over the few years that I've witnessed people boarding these planes, I've seen so many veterans, some barely able to walk to the plane unassisted, board with obvious pride. Some were making the journey with their grown children, some with grand or great grand kids, some by themselves. I even met one who was a German fighter pilot whose daughter bought him his ticket because he always wanted to see what it was like to fly from the perspective of those he was trying to shoot down (and those who were trying their level headed best to kill him.)
I suspect that for many of these men, being transported briefly back in time, brings to the forefront the defining moments of their lives. And I thank every one of them.

OK, we're in the Liberty Bell (which, by the way, isn't quite so easy to get into. You've got to grab hold of the rounded protrusion above the hatch and pull yourself up through a deceptively small portal. Unless of course, you decide to go ass backwards. That probably wouldn't have scored you any points with your crew mates. Please don't ask me how I boarded.) Your looking at one of two waist gunner's positions. The other one is diagonally opposite this one. I had a conversation with a veteran B-17 ball gunner a couple of years ago and expressed my admiration for the way that he voluntarily crammed himself into the belly turret under the fuselage, on every mission. He looked at me for a moment and then exclaimed that he wouldn't have wanted any other position on the B-17. If you've ever seen the belly turret, you'd understand my amazement at his statement. So I asked why? Simple he said. Look at the olive drab skin of the B-17 that surrounds the entire crew. It's a fraction of an inch of aluminum. The cannon shells and flack would rip through that material as though it was tissue paper he said. At least he had a hunk of solid steel (his gun) between him and the fighter planes spitting those lethal projectiles in his direction. I smiled and went on to another subject, not quite buying his explanation. But who am I to question him. Maybe that belief helped him swing his body through the small portal every day.

Moving forward, you lurch your way toward the front of the craft and come to the bomb bay area. The first surprise is, it's wide open. Yep, those are the bombs that drop out of the belly of the beast. And there's nothing to prevent anyone dropping with them if you're in the wrong spot at the wrong time (although I've never hear of that happening.) The next surprise is, see that 6" wide beam on the floor? Well, that's what you've got to negotiate to get to where the pilots and bomandier needed to be. Not so hard on the ground, probably not very easy in the air.

The next to the last position on our journey forward in the Liberty Bell. The cockpit. The seats look crude by today's standards and the instruments look very basic (not counting some of the newer dials that have obviously been installed due to safety regulations.) What got my attention was the all around superb visibility. Looking at the aircraft from the tarmac, you'd think that the squat looking cockpit position would have limited visibility. But not so, at least to my untrained eye. All together, a basic but handsome environment.

You wanna talk visibility? How about maybe a little too much visibility. This is the most forward position on the plane. It can only be accessed by crawling (I'm not kidding) under the cockpit. When you emerge from the opening, you step up slightly and now the bombardier is in position to arrive at his destination ever so shortly before his crew mates. And your instrument awaits. The Norden Bomb Site. This instrument was so hush hush and secret that (I've read) the bombardier had to remove it after every mission and place it under lock and key.

It must surely have felt to the bombardier that he was flying without an aircraft around him when he was leaning out over the bomb site. It must also have felt that he was naked and alone when being attacked from the front by a fighter whose combined closing speed could be 700+mph! Imagine seeing tracer bullets zero in on your B-17. And you're in front with nothing but Plexiglas between you and the cannon shells that you couldn't see but knew were there between the iridescent tracer shells. And it's my understanding that you had to volunteer to be part of the Army Air Force!

Now, I need your help. If you've read this far, please tell me, by leaving a comment, which of the next three pictures you like best. They are of course the same photo. The first one has been converted to black and white.

This one has been sepia toned.

And this one is more or less original.
Don't forget that if you want to get a closer look at any photo, all you have to do is place your cursor over the picture and click on the LEFT button.

Lastly, if you want to learn more about the worthy mission of the Liberty Foundation and learn more about this beautifully restored aircraft (and it really did fly missions during WWII, over 60 of them!,) please follow the web link below.
http://www.libertyfoundation.org/

Wednesday, September 24, 2008

Get a ruler. I'll wait.

OK, get a ruler. Go on. I'll wait.
LAlalalalalalaLa, etc.......................................

OK, got a ruler?
Good.
Now, measure 6" across. That's a half a foot, right?
About the size of, well........... what you see pictured below.
OK, now, imagine my surprise when I looked up at the rafters of the open roof covering our rear patio.
There, resting on a rafter, was the largest moth that I've ever seen. It looked rather drab and brown, until I photographed it with the flash. The colors exploded.
At first I thought it was a lunar moth, but I looked that up and that wasn't it. In fact, I couldn't find anything that looked even remotely like it in any book that we had or on the internet. Quite honestly, after about 4-5 days, I kind of removed it from my list of important things to ponder. Then, I received an email blurb from Tohono Chul Park (that's where used to Monica worked) and in the blurb was a photo of exactly what I had seen.
It turns out to have been a black witch moth, the largest moth found in North America. This one must have been returning to Mexico and Central America. They are nocturnal and normally will rest during the day and then fly off on their journey at dusk. They're so large that they're often mistaken for bats.
So, how do I know this was 6" across? Why, I took out a ruler and measured it.......during the daytime of course. Almost exactly 6". I understand that they can grow to 7"-8" across, especially the females. This one is a male. You can tell because it lacks a white band across the middle of it's back and wing span.

Well, I was amazed.
And I wanted to share it with you.

Sunday, July 20, 2008

Monsooooooon Lightning

A quick post to commemorate the beginning of the Monsoon season in Southern Arizona.
Prior to this year, the Monsoon season began on the third consecutive day that the dew point (a different way to measure humidity, or how much moisture the air is holding) was 54 degrees or higher. The average start has been July 4. But this year, the National Weather Service decided that was too complicated and decided that the Monsoon season would officially start on June 15, no matter what the weather actually was.
I dunno. I kind of liked the season starting when mother nature says so. HOWEVER, a look at these two photos makes it abundantly clear that the Monsoon is here and now.
These shots were taken Saturday night from our back patio. I stayed out until the lightning appeared to be getting a little too close. They say that if you can either hear or see it, head for cover.
It also amazes me that people still insist on driving into road dips and even running washes. It only takes 6" of running water to lift a car off of the road and into a wash. Saturday night's Monsoon storms resulted in two water rescue attempts. Unfortunately, one person still hasn't been found and the search has been suspended. Probably the first Monsoon fatality of the season.
It's an amazing part of America, so very different from the North East. We've still got so much to learn, thank goodness!

Friday, July 4, 2008

An Ordinary Snake Plant, but not to me.

This is the story of an ordinary looking snake plant. But this is no ordinary plant. Not to me.
The story starts back in the mid 1950s. My parents owned a retail store called the Carriage Corner in Brooklyn. Now the Carriage Corner was many things to many people, but it wasn't a store that occupied a corner. It surrounded the corner. The actual corner store was something else. In the mid 50s, my Dad had the opportunity to grab that middle corner portion and he did, thus making the store true to its name. As a good luck gift, someone gave my Dad the plant pictured above, which now sits in our living room in Tucson.
The snake plant lived happily (I hope) with our family in Rye Brook for many years. When we moved to Tucson, we didn't trust the movers to take it, so along with Monica's Dads Christmas Cactus (as near as Monica can ascertain, this one is from the 1930s,) my snake plant and of course Bisbee, I drove cross country. I bonded with all the other three living entities in the car. I had much to say over the 2400 odd miles or so. But I really had to keep the conversation going alot of the time. I'm not complaining. My passengers were excellent company.
So, aside from age, aside from lineage, aside from bonding, what's so special about the
snake plant?
A couple of things.
Now, this is the first and only snake plant I've ever owned. So I'm no Sansevieria expert, but some years ago we noticed an incredibly sweet floral aroma emanating from our Rye Brook kitchen. I wondered what outdoor plant we were aurally admiring when suddenly we realized that it was the ordinary looking snake plant, parked safely under a kitchen window. Now, I don't know about your snake plant, but this one faithfully throws up a sticky, sweet smelling stalk nearly every year now. I mean the aroma can stop you in your tracks! It's wonderful. Maybe they all do this. I don't know.
But, there's something else that I haven't mentioned yet. It's the second thing that makes this snake plant very special to me.
My father and mother were born and raised in England. Now, there are many Brits that came to our shores. I know of two of that share the same birthday (I'm sure there are many others,) and that particular birthday, to me, is full of wonderful irony.
Bob Hope is one or them.

My Dad is the other.
That birth date is July 4.
Today.
This picture to the right was taken July 4.
Today.
This ordinary snake plant has sprouted its sweet smelling stalk nearly every July 4 since it started sprouting flowers so long ago. Year after year after year......


Happy birthday Dad.


Wednesday, July 2, 2008

Queen of the Night

Yes, it's that time of the year. The air is heavier with moisture as the Monsoon envelopes the Sonoran Desert. The temperature soars into the upper 90s or low 100s. Why do we endure this? Many reasons, and here's one of them.


The beautiful and VERY fleeting Cereus flower. I'm sure we all remember the more popular name, Peniocereus greggii (he's got to be kidding!) But anyway, the fact of the matter is, this plant only blooms one night each year and the one in our front yard chose RIGHT NOW! Oddly enough, Tohono Chul Park's huge collection (the largest in the world maybe) chose tonight as well. Maybe these guys communicate telepathically, but for what ever reason, I'm sure glad we can enjoy this wondrous and unique sight from the Sonoran Desert.

Saturday, June 28, 2008

After Paradise, leaving Portal Az.

So, we left Paradise and started our trip to Silver City. The first place we hit was Portal Az. So you ask, why is it named Portal? As near as we could tell, because the town was at the head of the canyon you see here. Or, another words, Portal was the portal to the canyon in the Chiracahua Mountains. And in this case, the canyon was about to be whacked by an early monsoon storm. BTW, forgot to mention that we had to drive through a very impressive storm on the way to Paradise. Remember Alfred Tennyson's poem "The Charge of the Light Brigade?" It goes, " Cannon to right of them, Cannon to left of them, Cannon in front of them" Well just substitute the word lightning for cannon and you'd have a real good idea of how we felt for a while.
The area around Portal is very beautiful and very rugged. I know I used the word "rugged" in my prior post to describe this area. I'm lobbying for a new 4x4 something (Jeep Wrangler) type thing so we can explore areas like this, so get used to words like rugged. Rugged is not a BMW 330xi. Rugged is something with ground clearance that doesn't have super low profile tires. You know what I mean? Well, unfortunately, you don't count. And you know who does count? You've got it. Mountain Monica!!!!
I'd say she's looking pretty good!
We stayed in Portal this time just long enough to take a few photos. Next time, we explore in more depth. On to Silver City where we are now. Probably won't post any photos from there. Not that there aren't pic possibilities, it's just that walking a leashed Bisbee down a Main street with one hand and holding a camera in your other hand isn't conducive to taking loads of pictures. At least not for me. We'll come back here as well. Looks like there's plenty to see here and in the vicinity.
See you all soon.

HOLY CHIRACAHUA. GREETINGS FROM PARADISE

WELCOME TO PARADISE!!

PARADISE ARIZONA, THAT IS.
JUST BISBEE, MONICA AND ME, ALONG WITH THE COUPLE OF DOZEN FULL TIME RESIDENTS OF THIS FORMER MINING CAMP (ANOTHER BOOM TO BUST STORY, ANOTHER TIME) AND A ZILLION BIRDS.
BUT NOT JUST ANY BIRDS. NOOOO. SOME (MOST?) OF THESE BIRDS I'VE NEVER SEEN BEFORE.
IF YOUR A BIRDER (AND THEY'RE A BREED APART!) OR JUST LOVE BIRDS, THEN THIS REALLY IS PARADISE.


AWWWW SHUCKS.

WE DIDN'T HAVE TO GO FAR TO TAKE ANY OF THESE BIRD PHOTOS. RIGHT FROM THE PORCH OF OUR RUSTIC CABIN, ITSELF PERCHED 5400' IN THE CHIRICAHUA MOUNTAINS IN EXTREME SOUTH EAST ARIZONA.

THE BIRDS WERE SO OBLIGING, I COULD HAVE SAT THERE ALL DAY AND EXHAUSTED MY COMPACT FLASH CARD IN NO TIME.

WHAT, YOU LOOKING AT ME?

THESE BIRDS ARE A RIOT OF COLORS. IT'S REALLY SO RELAXING AND ENTERTAINING TO JUST SIT AND WATCH. BY THE WAY, I THOUGHT OF PROVIDING THE NAMES OF THESE BIRDS FOR YOU, BUT WHAT COULD YOU POSSIBLY NEED THAT FOR?
OK, I'VE NO IDEA WHAT MOST ARE CALLED.

THE VIEW FROM INSIDE THE PORCH. I PROBABLY SHOULD HAVE INCLUDED A VIEW FROM OUTSIDE THE PORCH, BUT I BECAME FIXATED ON THE BIRD SHOTS. SO TRUST ME, IT'S VERY NICE!

EVER THE INTREPID EXPLORER, MONICA MANS (WOMANS?) THE CAMERA AS WE MAKE OUR WAY TO THIS WILDERNESS, TRAVERSING OVER 12 MILES OF DIRT ROAD. WE HAD OUR DOUBTS AS TO WHETHER OUR CAR COULD HANDLE THIS, BUT SO FAR SO GOOD.

JUST TO GIVE YOU AN IDEA OF WHAT THE SURROUNDING AREA LOOKS LIKE. IT'S EXTREMELY RUGGED AND WILD. ABOUT THE ONLY TOURISTS YOU SEE ARE DIE HARD BIRDERS. IF YOU LOOK CAREFULLY AT THE RIGHT HAND SIDE OF THIS SHOT, THERE'S A ROCK FORMATION WITH AN ARCH THROUGH IT. UNFORTUNATELY, THERE'S NO WAY TO MANEUVER AROUND TO TAKE A PICTURE OF THE SUN OR MOON SETTING OR RISING THROUGH IT. NUTS. WHAT A SHOT THAT WOULD BE. APPARENTLY THE MYANS HAVEN'T BEEN THROUGH HERE.

THIS WASN'T AN UNCOMMON SITE. NO ONE ELSE HERE, AND THAT'S FINE FOR KEEPING THIS AREA SUCH AN EXCELLENT BIRDING AND HIKING AREA. THERE ARE HOWEVER, WILD FIRES. THE CENTER OF THIS SHOT SHOWS SMOKE FROM ONE OF THEM, ALTHOUGH WITHOUT BLOWING UP THE PIC, I DOUBT THAT YOU CAN SEE IT.

OK, MORE TO COME. WE'RE OFF TO SILVER CIY NEW MEXICO. WE'LL SEE WHAT WE SEE AND IF WE SEE ANYTHING WE THINK YOU'D LIKE TO SEE, WE'LL LET YOU SEE.
WHAT?

LOVE,
MONICA, LEIGH AND BISBEE TOO.

Friday, June 20, 2008

NYC JUNE TRIP, CONTINUED

FINALLY GOT TO SEE BRETT'S NEW APARTMENT IN MANHATTAN. ABSOLUTELY GREAT. IT'S IN A PARK LIKE SETTING AND IS WELL LOCATED NEAR THE PLACES BRETT LIKES TO SPEND TIME IN. WE'RE VERY PLEASED THAT HE'S PLEASED.

AND BECAUSE OLD DAD PROCRASTINATED ONCE AGAIN IN GETTING A BATTERY FOR HIS WATCH, BRETT SUPPLIED THE TIMELESS(?) FELLOW WITH A NICE WATCH FOR OUR STAY. TO MY ASTONISHMENT, THIS VERY WATCH IS BEING SOLD AT THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART. NICE WATCH BRETT, EVEN IF YOU DID TAKE IT BACK BEFORE WE LEFT FOR HOME.

ISN'T IT AMAZING THAT AS SOON AS YOU HIT THE STREETS OF NY, EVERYONE BECOMES A BLUR OF ENERGY? ESPECIALLY IN THIS FAMILY, WHEN THE FOOD ALARM SOUNDS. AND I MEAN THAT IN A GOOD WAY. I WOULD HAVE BEEN LEADING THE LINE HAD I NOT BEEN TAKING THE PICTURE.

AHHHHH. DINNER AT TONY NAPOLE'S. I LOVE TO EAT ON THE STREETS OF NYC. LOTS OF ENERGY AROUND YOU. AND IN THIS CASE, WE DINED UNDER A CONSTRUCTION SCAFFOLD. AND WE HAD GOOD FOOD AND HAD A GOOD TIME. WE DID CHECK TO MAKE SURE WE WEREN'T UNDER A CONSTRUCTION CRANE (NOT REALLY.)

UH OH. I'M GETTNG THAT LOOK. YOU KNOW. THE ONE THAT SAY, "ONE MORE SHOT AND YOU'LL BE WEARING THAT CAMERA!" OK, NO MORE...........TODAY.

I LOVE THE ENERGY IN THIS SHOT TAKEN AS DARKNESS DESCENDED WHILE WE ATE DINNER. AND THE RAIN DESCENDED AS WELL. BRETT TOOK THIS ONE. I REALLY LOVE IT.

A VICTORY CIGAR (TO CELEBRATE WHAT, I'M NOT SURE) AFTER BREAKFAST FOR STEVE.
EVERY DAY ON VACATION IS GREAT AND EVEN BETTER WHEN YOU CAN SPEND IT WITH FAMILY.

MORE POSTS TO COME.

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

NYC JUNE TRIP

SO, HAVE YOU EVER SEEN A BLOG POSTING ABOUT A TRIP START IN THE BATHROOM?
ME NEITHER.
BUT THIS WAS JUST TOO GOOD TO PASS UP. TUCSON INTERNATIONAL HAS RECENTLY UNDERGONE SOME SERIOUS CONSTRUCTION AND NOW THEY'RE GETTING DOWN TO THE NITTY GRITTY. WE TRAVEL OUT OF HERE OFTEN AND THIS IS NEW. AND VERY GOOD. IT'S A TILE MOSAIC THAT NOT ONLY DEPICTS THE USUAL MEN'S ROOM DATA VIA TILE GLYPHS (MEN ONLY, WHEEL CHAIR CAPABLE, LUGGAGE WELCOME, KID FRIENDLY, DIAPER STATION AVAILABLE, ETC.,) BUT ALSO DEPICTS THE POTENTIAL HIGH LIGHTS OF YOUR VISIT TO TUCSON (FOX THEATER, CONGRESS HOTEL, "A" MOUNTAIN, RIALTO THEATER, THE TUCSON MOUNTAINS, THE INCREDIBLY HOT AT THE MOMENT SUN, BARREL CACTI, ETC..)
I GUESS WE WERE SO FASINATED BY THIS BECAUSE IT REMINDED US OF THE NYC SUBWAY STATION TILE WORK. FOR THOSE WHO HAVEN'T NOTICED, MOST SUBWAY STOPS HAVE ORIGINAL TILE WORK DEPICTING SOMETHING UNIQUE ABOUT THAT STOP. NEEDLESS TO SAY, THE LADIES ROOM HAS A DIFFERENT BUT EQUALLY INTERESTING PICTO-TILE-MOSAIC. NICE JOB.


AND WHO SAYS FLYING IS BORING?
I LOVE THE WINDOW SEAT (AS LONG AS IT'S IN A TWO SEATER ROW, MONICA IS SITTING NEXT TO ME AND IT'S NOT A TRANS OCEANIC FLIGHT. SMALL DETAILS.) AND THIS TIME I WAS REWARDED WITH A MOST BEAUTIFUL CLOUD FORMATION SHORTLY AFTER LEAVING DALLAS.


EVERY VISIT TO NYC REMINDS ME OF WHY THIS PLACE CAN BOAST THAT IT'S THE CENTER OF THE UNIVERSE. CASE IN POINT. AIM YOUR CAMERA IN ALMOST ANY DIRECTION AND YOUR LIABLE TO SEE A CHURCH (SEE CROSS ABOVE.) IF YOU CAN'T SEE THE CROSS, USE YOUR LEFT CURSOR BUTTON TO MAKE THE PICTURE LARGER. IF YOU STILL CAN'T SEE THE CROSS, GET REAL AND GET GLASSES. SO FAR NOTHING YOU WOULDN'T SEE IN ANY OTHER AMERICAN CITY ( I KNOW, THAT'S THE CHRYSLER BUILDING IN THE SHOT. YOU WOULDN'T SEE THAT IN TOO MANY OTHER PLACES. BUT THAT'S NOT THE POINT.)


NOW THE FUN STARTS. I DON'T KNOW WHAT RELIGION OR COUNTRY OF ORIGIN THESE FOLKS ARE FROM. BUT I PROMISE YOU I DIDN'T GO OUT OF MY WAY TO BUMP INTO THEM. THESE THINGS ARE ALL OVER NYC. AND I LOVE THE REACTION OF THE TWO WOMEN IN THE PICTURE. ABSOLUTELY NO REACTION. TYPICAL NEW YORKERS.


FINALLY, WE BUMP INTO THE ISRAEL DAY PARADE. SIDE STREETS EAST AND WEST OF FIFTH AVENUE ARE SIMPLY JAMMED WITH PARADE PARTICIPANTS, WAITING THEIR TURN TO MARCH DOWN FIFTH. AGAIN, NO INTENTION, JUST ON OUR WAY TO SOMETHING ELSE (MUSEUM OF MODERN ART TO BE EXACT.)
THE CONFLUENCE OF SO MANY CULTURES, RELIGIONS AND NATIONALITIES IN THIS ONE SMALL PLACE IS AMAZING. THE FACT THAT FOR THE MOST PART EVERYONE GETS ALONG ON A DAILY BASIS IS AMAZING AND A BLESSING. AND MAYBE A SMALL PIECE OF EVIDENCE THAT THIS REALLY IS THE CENTER OF THE UNIVERSE.

NEXT POST COMING VERY SOON. STAY TUNED.

Tuesday, June 3, 2008

Tuesday, May 27, 2008

NOW WHICH ONE?

Which rendering of this photo looks best to your eye?
I edited (tweaked) one photo in three different programs.
iPhoto, Aperture and Nikon NX (that's not the order that they're in.)
I also included the original untouched photo.
Each program can do certain things. I was just curious what different eyes would see. Use your left cursor button to blow each picture up before you decide. Try not to peak below the photos to see which photo belongs to which program. So, which picture looks like "THE ONE" to you?





This is the order of the photos and the editing program, as they appear above.

#1 = Aperture
#2 = Nikon NX
#3 = Original untouched photo
#4 = iPhoto

What did this prove?

Just that most photos could use a little tweaking and that no one editing program does everything.

I found that Aperture does the best job of globally adjusting the highlights and shadows. As Monica pointed out, it did a great job on the clouds in the sky. But, it also adjusted the highlights in the entire picture.

Nikon NX does the best on particular trouble spots, like the flag pole with the eagle on top. It's also almost addictive to use, especially its "u point"(?) technology. Just lay a dot on a particular thing or color with your mouse, adjust the size of the circle and make changes that only affect that color or shade within your circle. Pretty cool.

iPhoto is the most convenient edit program to use, especially if that's how you've imported your photos into the computer. It's results are very good. But when you use the other programs, you realize you could have gone further.

Well, that was fun! Now to figure a way to take the photo directly from iPhoto into either of the other edit programs. So far, I've had to export the photo onto my desktop and then open the photo from there with the other edit program. Aperture gives you an option to choose another program as an external editor, making the process easier.

Later.

Leigh.

Monday, May 19, 2008

PRICKLY FULL MOON

100 DEGREES PLUS, TODAY.
HOT NIGHT.
PRICKLY FULL MOON




HOW DO THE ANIMALS NEGOTIATE SUCH A PRICKLY ENVIRONMENT AT NIGHT?